Side effects

Make sure Microgynon 30 is OK for you

It’s important that you understand the benefits and risks of taking the Pill before you start taking it, or when deciding whether to carry on taking it. Although the Pill is suitable for most healthy women it isn’t suitable for everyone.

► Tell your doctor if you have any of the illnesses or risk factors mentioned in the text.

Before you start taking the Pill:

● Your doctor will ask about you and your family’s medical problems, check your blood pressure and exclude the likelihood of you being pregnant. You may also need other checks, such as a breast examination, but only if these examinations are necessary for you, or if you have any special concerns.

While you’re on the Pill:

● You will need regular check-ups with your doctor or family planning nurse, usually when you need another prescription of the Pill.

● You should go for regular cervical smear tests.

● Check your breasts and nipples every month for changes – tell your doctor if you can see or feel anything odd, such as lumps or dimpling of the skin.

● If you need a blood test tell your doctor that you are taking the Pill, because the Pill can affect the results of some tests.

● If you’re going to have an operation, make sure your doctor knows about it. You may need to stop taking the Pill about 4–6 weeks before the operation. This is to reduce the risk of a blood clot (see number 1. below). Your doctor will tell you when you can start taking the Pill again.

1. The Pill and blood clots

The Pill may slightly increase your risk of having a blood clot (called a thrombosis), especially in the first year of taking it.

A clot in a leg vein – a deep vein thrombosis (or DVT) – is not always serious. However, if it moves up the veins and blocks an artery in the lungs, it can cause chest pain, breathlessness, collapse or even death. This is called a pulmonary embolism and is very rare.

Your chances of having a blood clot are only increased slightly by taking the Pill.

● Of 100,000 women who are not on the Pill and not pregnant, about 5 will have a blood clot in a year.

● Of 100,000 women taking a Pill such as Microgynon 30, about 15 will have a blood clot in a year.

● Of 100,000 women who are pregnant, around 60 will have a blood clot in a year.

Very rarely, blood clots can also form in the blood vessels of the heart (causing a heart attack) or the brain (causing a stroke). In healthy young women the chance of having a heart attack or stroke is extremely small.

You are more at risk of having a blood clot:

● as you get older

● if you smoke

● if you or any of your close family have had blood clots

● if you are seriously overweight

● if you have a disorder of blood fat (lipid) metabolism, or some other very rare blood disorders

● if you have high blood pressure

● if you suffer from migraines

● if you have a heart valve disorder or a particular type of irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation)

● if you have recently had a baby

● if you have diabetes

● if you have certain rare medical conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, sickle cell disease, Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis

● if you’re off your feet for a long time because of major surgery, injury or illness.

► Tell your doctor if any of these apply to you. Taking the Pill may add to this risk so Microgynon 30 may not be suitable for you.

Signs of a blood clot include:

● a migraine for the first time, a migraine that is worse than normal or unusually frequent or severe headaches

● any sudden changes to your eyesight (such as loss of vision or blurred vision)

● any sudden changes to your hearing, speech, sense of smell, taste or touch

● pain or swelling in your leg

● stabbing pain when you breathe

● coughing for no apparent reason

● pain and tightness in the chest

● sudden weakness or numbness in one side or part of your body

● dizziness or fainting.

► See a doctor as soon as possible. Do not take any more Microgynon 30 until your doctor says you can. Use another method of contraception, such as condoms, in the meantime.

2. The Pill and cancer

While high dose Pills reduce your risk of cancer of the ovary and womb if used in the long term, it is not clear whether lower dose Pills like Microgynon 30 also provide the same protective effects. However, it also seems that taking the Pill slightly increases your risk of cancer of the cervix – although this may be due to having sex without a condom, rather than the Pill. All women should have regular smear tests.

If you have breast cancer, or have had it in the past, you should not take the Pill. The Pill slightly increases your risk of breast cancer. This risk goes up the longer you’re on the Pill, but returns to normal within about 10 years of stopping it. Because breast cancer is rare in women under the age of 40, the extra cases of breast cancer in current and recent Pill users is small. For example:

● Of 10,000 women who have never taken the Pill, about 16 will have breast cancer by the time they are 35 years old.

● Of 10,000 women who take the Pill for 5 years in their early twenties, about 17–18 will have breast cancer by the time they are 35 years old.

● Of 10,000 women who have never taken the Pill, about 100 will have breast cancer by the time they are 45 years old.

● Of 10,000 women who take the Pill for 5 years in their early thirties, about 110 will have breast cancer by the time they are 45 years old.

Your risk of breast cancer is higher:

● if you have a close relative (mother, sister or grandmother) who has had breast cancer

● if you are seriously overweight

► See a doctor as soon as possible if you notice any changes in your breasts, such as dimpling of the skin, changes in the nipple or any lumps you can see or feel.

Taking the Pill has also been linked to liver diseases, such as jaundice and non-cancer liver tumours, but this is rare. Very rarely, the Pill has also been linked with some forms of liver cancer in women who have taken it for a long time.

► See a doctor as soon as possible if you get severe pain in your stomach, or yellow skin or eyes (jaundice). You may need to stop taking Microgynon 30.

3. Microgynon 30 should not be taken by some women

► Tell your doctor or family planning nurse if you have any medical problems or illnesses.

Do not take Microgynon 30 if any of the following apply to you. Taking Microgynon 30 would put your health at risk.

● If you have or have ever had breast cancer

● If you have ever had a problem with your blood circulation. This includes a blood clot (thrombosis) in the legs (deep vein thrombosis), lungs (pulmonary embolism), heart (heart attack), brain (stroke) or any other parts of the body

● If you have any condition which makes you more at risk of a blood clot (thrombosis – see section 2.1, The Pill and blood clots)

● If you have very high or uncontrolled blood pressure

● If you have any symptoms of a blood clot, such as chest pain (angina pectoris) or ‘mini- stroke’ (transient ischaemic attack)

● If you have ever suffered from migraine with visual disturbances

● If you have ever had a severe liver disease, and you have been told by your doctor that your liver function test results are not yet back to normal

● If you have ever had liver tumours

● If you have severe diabetes affecting your blood vessels

● If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to any of the ingredients in Microgynon 30

► If you suffer from any of these, or get them for the first time while taking Microgynon 30, contact your doctor as soon as possible. Do not take Microgynon 30.

4. Microgynon 30 can make some illnesses worse

Some of the conditions listed below can be made worse by taking the Pill. Or they may mean it is less suitable for you. You may still be able to take Microgynon 30 but you need to take special care and have check-ups more often.

● If you have diabetes

● If you or your close family have ever had problems with your heart, or circulation such as high blood pressure

● If you or your close family have ever had problems with blood clotting

● If you have the inherited disease called porphyria

● If you are overweight (obese)

● If you have migraines

● If you have inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) or a history or family history of high levels of fat in your blood (hypertriglyceridemia), as you may be at risk of developing pancreatitis

● If you have any illness that worsened during pregnancy or previous use of the Pill (see number 2. ‘Less serious side effects’ in the ‘Possible side effects’ section)

► Tell your doctor or family planning nurse if any of these apply to you. Also tell them if you get any of these for the first time while taking the Pill, or if any get worse or come back, because you may need to stop taking Microgynon 30.

5. Taking other medicines

If you ever need to take another medicine at the same time as being on the Pill, always tell your doctor, pharmacist or dentist that you’re taking Microgynon 30. Also check the leaflets that come with all your medicines to see if they can be taken with hormonal contraceptives.

Some medicines can stop Microgynon 30 from working properly – for example:

● some medicines used to treat epilepsy

● some medicines used to treat HIV

● griseofulvin (an anti-fungal medicine)

● certain antibiotics

● certain sedatives (called barbiturates)

● St. John’s Wort (a herbal remedy).

If you do need to take one of these medicines, Microgynon 30 may not be suitable for you or you may need to use extra contraception for a while. Your doctor, pharmacist or dentist can tell you if this is necessary and for how long.

Microgynon 30 can also affect how well other medicines work. Your doctor may need to adjust the dose of your other medicine.

In addition, Microgynon 30 can also interfere with the results of some blood tests, so always tell your doctor that you are taking Microgynon 30 if you have a blood test.

6. Taking Microgynon 30 with food and drink

There are no special instructions about food and drink while on Microgynon 30.

7. Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Do not use Microgynon 30 if you are pregnant. If you think you might be pregnant, do a pregnancy test to confirm that you are before you stop taking Microgynon 30.

If you are breast-feeding, your doctor or family planning nurse may advise you not to take Microgynon 30. They will be able to suggest alternative contraception. Breast-feeding may not stop you getting pregnant.

8. Taking more than one pill should not cause harm

It is unlikely that taking more than one pill will do you any harm, but you may feel sick, vomit or have some vaginal bleeding. Talk to your doctor if you have any of these symptoms.

9. Driving and using machines

Microgynon 30 has no known effect on the ability to drive or use machines.

10.Microgynon 30 contains lactose and sucrose

If you have been told by your doctor that you have intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before using Microgynon 30.

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS

Like all medicines, Microgynon 30 can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

► Tell your doctor, pharmacist or family planning nurse if you are worried about any side effects which you think may be due to Microgynon 30.

1. Serious side effects – see a doctor straight away

Signs of a blood clot:

● a migraine for the first time, a migraine that is worse than normal, or unusually frequent or severe headaches

● any sudden changes to your eyesight (such as loss of vision or blurred vision)

● any sudden changes to your hearing, speech, sense of smell, taste or touch

● pain or swelling in your leg

● stabbing pain when you breathe

● coughing for no apparent reason

● pain and tightness in the chest

● sudden weakness or numbness in one side or part of your body

● dizziness or fainting.

Signs of a severe allergic reaction or worsening of hereditary angioedema:

● swelling of the hands, face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat. A swollen tongue/throat may lead to difficulty swallowing and breathing

● a red bumpy rash (hives) and itching.

Signs of breast cancer include:

● dimpling of the skin

● changes in the nipple

● any lumps you can see or feel.

Signs of cancer of the cervix include:

● vaginal discharge that smells and/or contains blood

● unusual vaginal bleeding

● pelvic pain

● painful sex.

Signs of severe liver problems include:

● severe pain in your upper abdomen

● yellow skin or eyes (jaundice)

● inflammation of the liver (hepatitis)

● your whole body starts itching.

► If you think you may have any of these, see a doctor straight away. You may need to stop taking Microgynon 30.

2. Less serious side effects

Common side effects (between 100 and 1000 in every 10,000 users may be affected)

● feeling sick

● stomach ache

● putting on weight

● headaches

● depressive moods or mood swings

● sore or painful breasts

Uncommon side effects (between 10 and 100 in every 10,000 users may be affected)

● being sick and stomach upsets

● fluid retention

● migraine

● loss of interest in sex

● breast enlargement

● skin rash, which may be itchy

Rare side effects (between 1 and 10 in every 10,000 users may be affected)

● poor tolerance of contact lenses

● losing weight

● increase of interest in sex

● vaginal or breast discharge

Other side effects reported

● Bleeding and spotting between your periods can sometimes occur for the first few months but this usually stops once your body has adjusted to Microgynon 30. If it continues, becomes heavy or starts again, contact your doctor (see number 3. below).

● Chloasma (yellow brown patches on the skin). This may happen even if you have been using Microgynon 30 for a number of months. Chloasma may be reduced by avoiding too much sunlight and/or UV lamps

● Occurrence or deterioration of the movement disorder chorea

● Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis

● Conditions that may worsen during pregnancy or previous use of the Pill:

- yellowing of the skin (jaundice)

- persistent itching (pruritus)

- kidney or liver problems

- gall stones

- certain rare medical conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus

- blister-like rash (herpes gestationis) whilst pregnant

- an inherited form of deafness (otosclerosis)

- a personal or family history of a form of sickle cell disease

- swelling of body parts (hereditary angioedema)

- an inherited disease called porphyria

- cancer of the cervix

► Tell your doctor, pharmacist or family planning nurse if you are worried about any side effects which you think may be due to Microgynon 30. Also tell them if any existing conditions get worse while you are taking Microgynon 30.

3. Bleeding between periods should not last long

A few women have a little unexpected bleeding or spotting while they are taking Microgynon 30, especially during the first few months. Normally, this bleeding is nothing to worry about and will stop after a day or two. Keep taking Microgynon 30 as usual. The problem should disappear after the first few strips.

You may also have unexpected bleeding if you are not taking your pills regularly, so try to take your pill at the same time every day. Also, unexpected bleeding can sometimes be caused by other medicines.

► Make an appointment to see your doctor if you get breakthrough bleeding or spotting that:

● carries on for more than the first few months

● starts after you’ve been taking Microgynon 30 for a while

● carries on even after you’ve stopped taking Microgynon 30.

Other contraceptive pills side effects:

Loestrin side effects

Mercilon side effects

Qlaira side effects

Ovranette side effects



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